Sunday, 27 December 2009

The One Million Dollars Question

Which Crime Specialist Director in London did David Payne phoned on 4th May 2007 at 23:13? (Thank you, UnterdenTeppich, from Twitter)
By the way, don't forget this brilliant analysis published by “www.mccannfiles.com”:
  
David Payne describes Madeleine

Extract from David Payne's statement to Leicestershire police on 10 April 2008

"Mmm..., errr... Madeleine's, errr... a very striking, errr... beautiful child, I'd almost - if I want a better phrase - call her doll-like, you know. She was very, you know, I think, you know, very unique looking child, errr... she'd got very pretty, you know, blonde hair, errr... in a bob, she was quite a petite, errr... child and, you know, she was very bubbly, very, errr... you know, she was a very good child to, to interact with. She was very bright, you could have a lot of fun with Madeleine, errr... and, you know, she, she was, you know, Kate and Gerry's, you know, pride and joy. They'd had a lot of trouble conceiving, you know, with IVF and everything and, you know, Madeleine was their miracle. She was obviously very unique with the fact that she'd got the, you know, the iris defect, errr... but, you know, she was certainly a happy go lucky child, you know, she was, she would interact with the other children very well, as I said on the other, earlier recording, you know, she played very happily with L*** and, you know, indeed the other children. She was, you know, very... she is a very beautiful child and good fun." 

(..)"You know, I, you know, a fact I've come across already you know, she was a... she's a very bright child, you know, she wouldn't be the kind of mischievous child who, you know, and just try and get out of the flat and, you know, get up to mischief and that, you know, there's fun in all children but she certainly wasn't that kind of child. She was very bright."

Now the same statement, with the past tense highlighted:

"Mmm..., errr... Madeleine's, errr... a very striking, errr... beautiful child, I'd almost - if I want a better phrase - call her doll-like, you know. She was very, you know, I think, you know, very unique looking child, errr... she'd got very pretty, you know, blonde hair, errr... in a bob, she was quite a petite, errr... child and, you know, she was very bubbly, very, errr... you know, she was a very good child to, to interact with. She was very bright, you could have a lot of fun with Madeleine, errr... and, you know, she... she was, you know, Kate and Gerry's, you know, pride and joy. They'd had a lot of trouble conceiving, you know, with IVF and everything and, you know, Madeleine was their miracle. She was obviously very unique with the fact that she'd got the, you know, the iris defect, errr... but, you know, she was certainly a happy go lucky child, you know, she was... she would interact with the other children very well, as I said on the other, earlier recording, you know, she played very happily with L*** and, you know, indeed the other children. She was, you know, very... she is a very beautiful child and good fun." 
 
(..)"You know, I, you know, a fact I've come across already you know she was a... she's a very bright child. you know, she wouldn't be the kind of mischievous child who, you know, and just try and get out of the flat and, you know, get up to mischief and that, you know, there's fun in all children but she certainly wasn't that kind of child. She was very bright."

- Not only is it disturbing that David Payne consistently talks of Madeleine in the past tense but also that he feels the need, on two occasions, to quickly correct himself into the present tense.

With 'you know' highlighted:

"Mmm..., errr... Madeleine's, errr... a very striking, errr... beautiful child, I'd almost - if I want a better phrase - call her doll-like, you know. She was very, you know, I think, you know, very unique looking child, errr... she'd got very pretty, you know, blonde hair, errr... in a bob, she was quite a petite, errr... child and, you know, she was very bubbly, very, errr... you know, she was a very good child to, to interact with. She was very bright, you could have a lot of fun with Madeleine, errr... and, you know, she, she was, you know, Kate and Gerry's, you know, pride and joy. They'd had a lot of trouble conceiving, you know, with IVF and everything and, you know, Madeleine was their miracle. She was obviously very unique with the fact that she'd got the, you know, the iris defect, errr... but, you know, she was certainly a happy go lucky child, you know, she was, she would interact with the other children very well, as I said on the other, earlier recording, you know, she played very happily with L*** and, you know, indeed the other children. She was, you know, very... she is a very beautiful child and good fun." 

 
(..)"You know, I, you know, a fact I've come across already, you know, she was a... she's a very bright child, you know, she wouldn't be the kind of mischievous child who, you know, and just try and get out of the flat and, you know, get up to mischief and that, you know, there's fun in all children but she certainly wasn't that kind of child. She was very bright."


- The use of 'you know' 23 times by David Payne, could suggest three things:
1) He is not comfortable with silence or pauses in the conversation. But that would seem unusual for someone who held a position as Senior Research Fellow in cardiovascular sciences at Leicester University.
2) He is using the words 'you know' as a stalling device to give himself more time to think about what he is saying. But, given that he is simply describing Madeleine's character, why should he need to employ such a technique?
3) He is using the words 'you know' in an attempt, consciously or subconsciously, to convince the listener that he is telling the truth. But why this desire?