Sunday, 30 December 2012

"I have absolutely no doubt"

One of the most common phrases that we were able to read or listen in TV, since 2007 is “I have absolutely no doubt!. Hundreds of “witnesses” were absolutely sure that a good number of blonde girls were Madeleine Mccann. But all of them just look at the girl and did nothing, like shouting, confronting the adults that were with the children or following them and calling the police, at the same time. 
May be they had no mobile phone, like all the Tapas Seven, when they went out for dinner, the night Madeleine disappear. Ray Roberts, from Anglesey, North Wales, was on holidays in Malta. He saw Madeleine Mccann. According to the MailOnline, he saw a girl in the north-eastern town of Sliema wearing what he said was a jet black wig being told: "Get up little girl," by an Arab-looking man. "The more I think about what I saw the more convinced I become that it may well have been Madeleine," he said.
But that is what he said to the newspaper. Police in Malta denied that Mr. Ray Roberts has filed any report or even contacted authorities. But Ray Roberts wasn't alone. In a couple of days, police had to deal with a total of 12 sightings of blonde girls that were – according with the “witnesses” - Madeleine Mccann. Of course, none of those sightings were confirmed.
Belgian police had a more difficult task: 107 people were absolutely surethat they saw Madeleine Mccann. This is a phenomenon worth to be investigated. Is it a need to be in the news, to be famous, to see their names printed on a newspaper? Is it what Andy Warhol said, in1968? "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes?”

" I have no doubt in my mind.”


One of the most common phrases that we were able to read or listen in TV, since 2007 is “I have no doubt in my mind.” Hundreds of “witnesses” were absolutely sure that a good number of blonde girls were Madeleine Mccann. But all of them just look at the girl and did nothing, like shouting, confronting the adults that were with the children or following them and calling the police, at the same time. May be they had no mobile phone, like all the Tapas Seven, when they went out for dinner, the night Madeleine disappear.
Ray Roberts, from Anglesey, North Wales, was on holidays in Malta. He saw Madeleine Mccann. According to the MailOnline, he saw a girl in the north-eastern town of Sliema wearing what he said was a jet black wig being told: "Get up little girl," by an Arab-looking man. "The more I think about what I saw the more convinced I become that it may well have been Madeleine," he said.
But that is what he said to the newspaper. Police in Malta denied that Mr. Ray Roberts has filed any report or even contacted authorities. But Ray Roberts wasn't alone. In a couple of days, police had to deal with a total of 12 sightings of blonde girls that were – according with the “witnesses” - Madeleine Mccann. Of course, none of those sightings were confirmed.
Belgian police had a more difficult task: 107 people were absolutely sure that they saw Madeleine Mccann. This is a phenomenon worth to be investigated. Is it a need to be in the news, to be famous, to see their names printed on a newspaper? Is it what Andy Warhol said, in 1968? "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes?”

Foreign Office alerted about the lack of co-operation of the Mccann with the Portuguese police


The Foreign Office was alerted to fears over Gerry and Kate McCann by a British diplomat in Portugal just days after their daughter Madeleine went missing. The diplomat was sent to the holiday resort of Praia da Luz in the days following the four-year-old's disappearance and soon became concerned over "inconsistencies" in the testimonies by her parents and their friends.
After visiting the McCanns, the unnamed diplomat sent a report to the Foreign Office in London, admitting his worries about "confused declarations" of the McCanns' movements on the night of May 3.
He also noted the couple's "lack of co-operation" with the Portuguese police.
The diplomat's concerns were made over four months before Gerry and Kate were named arguidos (suspects) on September 7.
Contents of the letter were leaked to Belgian newspaper La Dernière Heure over the weekend.
The diplomat expressed his fears after receiving instruction from the Foreign Office to provide "all possible assistance to the McCann couple".
The French-language paper printed excerpts of the letter, quoting the diplomat as saying: "With the greatest respect, I would like to make you aware of the risks and implications to our relationship with the Portuguese authorities, if you consider the possible involvement of the couple.
"Please confirm to me, in the light of these concerns, that we want to continue to be closely involved in the case as was requested in your previous ­message."

Sunday, 23 December 2012

Alex Wolfall: no sugestion Maddie was snatched


AlexWoolfall  (McCanns' first spokesman):

'Mr Woolfall says that he heard no suggestion in the early days that the girl had been snatched. 'Certainly I did not hear any discussion that this could be a paedophile or an aggravated robbery. All the time I was around it was whether she could have wandered off and had an accident or somebody had actually taken her in, perhaps not with ill-intent. During the first 48 hours the word being used was 'missing' rather than 'abducted' or any link with a paedophile or any sort of crime. Towards the end of the second week I detected a shift towards there being a consciousness that she had probably been taken rather than wandered off, just on the assumption that anybody would have found her by now."'

Times interview, 06 October 2007

John Hill, manager of Ocean Resort, said "there was no physical evidence that the girl had been abducted from the family's rented apartment while they ate at the tapas restaurant 200 yards away. It's still questionable as to whether it's an abduction," he said. "We are hoping that Madeleine is found as soon as possible and safe and well." But Jill Renwick, a family friend, told GMTV that the parents were certain that Madeleine has been abducted.

Algarve Resident 11 Setembro 2007

Kate Mccann: The night she went missing there was about 20 seconds of disbelief where I thought 'that can't be right'. I was checking for her. Then there was panic and fear. That was the first thing that hit. I was screaming her name. I ran to the group. Everyone was the same. It was just total fear. I never thought for one second that she'd walked out. I knew someone had been in the apartment because of the way it had been left. But I knew she wouldn't do that anyway. There wasn't a shadow of a doubt in my mind she'd been taken.


The Independent 05 August 2007

in www.mccannfiles.com

Sunday, 16 December 2012

Noises but no tears...

I'm back, but slowly, after a health problem. Still working in the book "The Mccann War". I have found some interesting things, in my research.

"GNR Officer J.M.B.R. found the parents to be nervous and anxious, he did not see any tears from either of them although they produced noises identical to crying. He did not feel that this was an abduction, although this was the line indicated by the father."


THE spokesman for the family of Madeleine McCann has reversed a statement made in the early days of the search for the missing child (...) However, in the early part of the hunt, friends and family members told journalists that the shutter on the apartment where the McCanns were staying had been broken.
Mr Mitchell made his comments when questioned by a 'Prime Time' team in a report on the disappearance to be screened tomorrow. "There was no evidence of a break-in," said Mr Mitchell.
"I'm not going into the detail, but I can say that Kate and Gerry are firmly of the view that somebody got into the apartment and took Madeleine out the window as their means of escape, and to do that they did not necessarily have to tamper with anything. They got out of the window fairly easily.

Clarence Mitchell backtracks on previous statement about watches
"Mitchell said he was not surprised by the inconsistencies in the initial accounts. 'You had nine people in a bar without watches on, without mobile phones, and absolute panic set in when they realised what had happened.
The Guardian 06 April 2008 
"It was made out to be the biggest 'conspiracy' since the Diana 'conspiracy,'" says Mitchell. "Some of the group (of friends in the tapas restaurant) had their watches on that night, and others didn't...
Yorkshire Post 29 May 2008